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Kristen is a home­maker, home­schooler, and a home­keeper. Her experience includes nineteen years of practice, raising three kids, a husband, and a dog. Writing about her life helps her stay sane. She believes that sharing stories helps others by providing opportunities to share advice (and helpful hints) about homeschooling, and raising kids on the autism spectrum, while supporting marriages and families that are striving to thrive.



We're All a Little Mad Here

 

 

Now, I can’t even pretend to be an expert here... I can write about being more neighborly, and why it is important to know my neighbors and how it can benefit me, my neighborhood, my community and the whole wide world. Walking the walk, as they say, is harder than talking the talk. Oh, how that is so true in life!

I have, however, come up with a few ways to break through some of the barriers that pervade our (now, seemingly) isolationistic society. Here is the disclaimer to following the  advice from a non-sociology-educated-regular-type of person: Proceed with enthusiasm and caution and common sense. Prepare for some people to be receptive, and for some to not want any part of knowing the joy that is you making time to be a good neighbor. No need to slip on tennis shoes or a red cardigan or to sing “Won’t you be my neighbor,” but looking somewhat put together is probably a good idea (I think most days I’m wearing the frazzled mom look with pride, and I’d scare myself if I looked out the peephole in my door to me)... And always wear a smile.

 

 

Food. Food has a way of bringing all kinds of people together. Muffins are easy to make (from a box- I wouldn’t know where to begin with the “from scratch” approach). We woke up one day last month to fire-trucks and medic units outside of our neighbor’s house. I knew the husband had been deteriorating, but this seemed kind of sudden. He had indeed passed away that morning. We brought muffins the next morning for the surviving wife and her family members that were beginning to arrive from out of town. Sad people need reminders to eat. Food can be for good times, too, of course. Our community does an annual chili cook-off in February, for example (perfect timing, in my opinion, because it is the dead of winter, and chili will warm up the coldest of hearts). Why not make plans to actually attend? I think I might go to mine this year. Maybe you can start an annual tradition in your community, and use the lure of food to bring neighbors together.

Holiday treats. Every October a “boo” tradition takes place in our neighborhood. It’s fun to make like a ninja and leave treats on your neighbor’s porch. At Easter we do the “you’ve been egged” tradition (candy eggs, by the way, not vandalism eggs). Valentine’s Day means little heart treats. Leave a little card with your name and number with the treats, if you so desire. That can open up a path of communication, at least, with people you might not have occasion to talk to otherwise. If nothing else, just leave a note that says something along the lines of, “Your neighbor at ---- is thinking about you!”

 

 

Block Party. Don’t be shy about scheduling a block party. I recommend it not be scheduled around a holiday because so many people travel around those times of year. I’ve missed all but one of our block parties because of holiday travel, because the parties were always over July Fourth, or Labor Day or Memorial Day Weekend. Be bold! Schedule a block party one random weekend during the summer! Tell everyone to bring a beverage, a dish to share, and meat (or veggie burgers) to grill. Fill up some water balloons, grab some squirt guns, set up a canopy, and let the fun, and the get-to-know-yous begin! This ties nicely back into food bringing people together; and water fights are always bringing kids together. It works!

 

 

Walking Club. In Germany people participate in volksmarches all the time. Literally, communities host marches through their town or city, a section of the nearby forest, or on trails through cities, like, every weekend. I remember walking and earning medals and keeping a corkboard for patches from various volksmarches that I attended with my parents and brother. I didn’t have to run, swim, or bike a ridiculous amount of miles, either. It was just walking, enjoying the weather, and earning a medal. Now, why don’t we do that here in America? Well, actually, there are a few volksmarches here. The Porter library actually hosted a kind of virtual one all last year, where you could log in your miles and such. I think, though, that this could be done on a somewhat smaller scale through neighborhoods. Medals aren’t even needed. Just walk together. It’s like a running club, too, which I know exist.

 

 

And here is my favorite: Books. Host a book club!! I love to read, and many of my friends do, too. I’m in two book clubs right now, and one is in my neighborhood! Did you know that the library has bagged books for book clubs? It’s even free! Start a neighborhood book club for adults or kids, or even a mother-daughter (father/son, mommy/kid) type of club. Your brain, your children (their teachers), your neighbors will thank you. Books are a great way to bring people together. It’s true!

So, hopefully I haven’t scared anybody off! Make friends with your neighbors. Talk to them, bring them food, or share a book or a walk together. Remember that we are all trying to raise up a generation, and that generation would benefit by knowing their neighbors, and so will you... benefit, that is. Keep calm, make friends, and parent on!

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