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Kristen is a home­maker, home­schooler, and a home­keeper. Her experience includes nineteen years of practice, raising three kids, a husband, and a dog. Writing about her life helps her stay sane. She believes that sharing stories helps others by providing opportunities to share advice (and helpful hints) about homeschooling, and raising kids on the autism spectrum, while supporting marriages and families that are striving to thrive.

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We're All a Little Mad Here

autumn leaves

 

I'm sure everybody is getting so very fed up with the political talk going around and around this fall. Now, don't run away, because I'm not really writing a political post, here. I'm sure, though, that most people are more fed up than usual this election cycle than in previous years. I know just because I'm on social media. I have a theory that social media is turning otherwise rational adults into toddlers throwing temper tantrums… I mean, there is just overwhelming amounts of garbage on the Internet, and people I know and love are saying/posting/re-posting some crazy things! It's hard to not feel the effects of such negativity. 

What to do?

Well, I have some good advice about how to stay positive, and how to keep your sanity intact during this time and season!

 

 

First of all, just don't engage! Especially on social media, I'm seeing grown adults posting rant, after rant about why they are right, and why they have the best answers. I’m guilty of having responded to some of these rants early on in the year, but now I'm afraid that some people I care about will unfriend me based on some comments I may make about a political candidate. No friendship is worth that, in my opinion! I have friends that are both liberal and conservative, some who don't vote, some that are from other countries, and some that are socialist. Say this after me: we are not all the same. Appreciate that we don't all have the same opinion, and it may be better to just not engage.

Second of all, should you want to debate, or state an opinion on some topic that you are passionate about, proceed with the intent of having good manners. Take turns. Be fair. Don't speak hate. Agree to disagree. Be respectful. We are the adults, after all, and we should act accordingly. Little people are watching us, and they have big ears to listen with, as well, and unless you want to hang a sign around their sweet little necks that says, "the opinions expressed by these children are not necessarily the same as their parents," you might want to watch what you say.

 

 

Third, remember that we have three branches to our government. Whomever gets elected in November is not the Supreme Leader of the New Order, nor is that person all-powerful, all-knowing, the end-all-be-all forever, amen. The world will probably not end. I'm pretty sure our country will not dissolve. Some people may decide to flee, or become ex-pats somewhere, and that will be OK, too, because people here have freedom to make those choices. The United States of America is still one of the greatest, wealthiest, and best countries in the world, regardless of what some may say. We are free, as Americans, we can vote, and we have liberty to make decisions for ourselves and our families.

While the election seems to be dominating the news, and consuming the Internet, remember that it is October! The leaves are beautiful! Fredericksburg and the surrounding areas have some of the best things to do, like hikes, pumpkin patches, and apple picking. Turn the political noise off for a bit, and engage instead with your kids, your spouse, your friends, and nature. There are oodles of things you can do to avoid the vacuum that is an election season in Northern Virginia. 

 

 

So, keep calm, keep your friends, and parent on!

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Pouches' Community Corner

This month Pouches learned about a very important resource for families who have lost loved ones to sudden tragedy, an organization called LLOST.

keepsake box

The foundation has helped 44 hospitals in 22 states through their Treasured Memories program. The program sends nurses to bereavement training, and provides or supplements the $55 memory boxes that include clothes, booties, handknot blankets, pictures, foot prints, hand prints, clipped hair and other mementos.

Read more...