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Kristen is a home­maker, home­schooler, and a home­keeper. Her experience includes nineteen years of practice, raising three kids, a husband, and a dog. Writing about her life helps her stay sane. She believes that sharing stories helps others by providing opportunities to share advice (and helpful hints) about homeschooling, and raising kids on the autism spectrum, while supporting marriages and families that are striving to thrive.

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We're All a Little Mad Here

Dear Drivers of the Greater DC Metropolitan Area,

Recently, my sweet fifteen year old girl got her learner’s permit. Her nineteen year old brother got his on the same day, but I only take him to very large parking lots to practice driving. His father and I are going to let the state teach him behind-the-wheel before we try to take him driving in this area. My daughter, though, is learning primarily from us.

 

 

Please, please, please be patient, because I'm writing on behalf of several parents who are teaching their teens to drive. It is the most nerve-wracking thing in the world to let your child have control of the family swagger wagon. If you don't have teens, you probably can't appreciate that, but I urge you to stretch your imagination for a few minutes to go there with me.

I understand that I-95 is a soul-sucking experience. I know, because I used to commute, and it was bad way back in the nineties, and I know it has only gotten worse. My husband still commutes, I hear the traffic reports, and I get it. However, no matter what kind of mind-numbing experience you have just endured on I-95, honking at my precious daughter because she lawfully stopped at a red light is not necessary. Furthermore, exaggerated shoulder shrugs and hand raising only frighten her, which will probably cause her to drive even slower when the light turns green. So, please refrain from that kind of behavior. The extra three minutes at a red light are not going to impact the two hour commute home that you have just suffered through.

While Stafford and the surrounding counties are growing in population astronomically, the roads are not being accommodated at the same rate. Many of them are winding, and are only two lanes wide. I believe the speed limits on most of these types of roads are thirty-five to forty mph. So, if you are going upwards of fifty mph around a blind turn and happen to have to brake abruptly because my daughter is pulling onto the road, the one-fingered salute you hastily flashed at us is really, truly offensive, and not well received by her, her younger sister, or me. We are trying to stay out of the way, believe me. Also, slow down!! 

 

 

Finally, parking lots are for parking. They are neither drag racing tracks nor are those geometric white lines to be ignored. So, if you feel the need to cut through all those white lines at an exaggerated speed, and my daughter, consequently, has to slam on the brakes of our vehicle, don't be surprised when I look slightly incredulous at you. I'm simply trying to not exit the vehicle so that I do not accidentally cut off your oxygen supply. I'm exhibiting self control. I'm saving your life. Furthermore, this situation does not then give you any reason to honk at us, or to squeal your tires to go around us, nor to flash rude gestures at us while yelling out your open windows expletives and unflattering names. Did you not learn in kindergarten that bullying is not acceptable?

In closing, people who operate a motor vehicle should act their age and not like a toddler in the middle of a temper tantrum. Said behavior is so not appreciated by any of the other drivers in this region, especially those that are teaching their children to drive. Slow down. Be patient. Be kind. Avoid rude gestures, especially to ladies... especially to young ladies. 

Manners! Language! It all matters. You can't go wrong with good manners in any life situation, truly.

 

 

Sincerely,
A concerned mother of a teenage driver

PS: Slow down and enjoy the view:)

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